They Used Dark Forces (Gregory Sallust, #8)

They Used Dark Forces Gregory Sallust May Jun Was Hitler a Satanist No actual proof has yet emerged but there is ample evidence to suggest that he regularly consulted occultists They Used Dark Forces which is set in the Secon

  • Title: They Used Dark Forces (Gregory Sallust, #8)
  • Author: Dennis Wheatley
  • ISBN: 9780749322779
  • Page: 196
  • Format: Paperback
  • May 1943 6 Jun 1945Was Hitler a Satanist No actual proof has yet emerged, but there is ample evidence to suggest that he regularly consulted occultists.They Used Dark Forces, which is set in the Second World War, features secret agent Gregory Sallust, this time in the company of an ex Bolshevik General named Stefan Kuporovitch Parachuted into Nazi Germany, the two of tMay 1943 6 Jun 1945Was Hitler a Satanist No actual proof has yet emerged, but there is ample evidence to suggest that he regularly consulted occultists.They Used Dark Forces, which is set in the Second World War, features secret agent Gregory Sallust, this time in the company of an ex Bolshevik General named Stefan Kuporovitch Parachuted into Nazi Germany, the two of them join forces with the widow of a German diplomat who is in contact with Allied Intelligence It is through her that Gregory becomes unwillingly involved with a Jewish Black Magician, and when, sixteen months later, they meet again, each decides to use occult forces in an attempt to destroy the maniac Hitler once and for all

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    2 thoughts on “They Used Dark Forces (Gregory Sallust, #8)

    1. Dennis Yates Wheatley 8 January 1897 10 November 1977 Born Dennis Yeats Wheatley was an English author His prolific output of stylish thrillers and occult novels made him one of the world s best selling authors in the 1950s and 1960s.His first book, Three Inquisitive People, was not immediately published but his first published novel, The Forbidden Territory, was an immediate success when published in 1933, being reprinted seven times in seven weeks.He wrote adventure stories, with many books in a series of linked works His plots covered the French Revolution Roger Brook Series , Satanism Duc de Richleau , World War II Gregory Sallust and espionage Julian Day.In the thirties, he conceived a series of whodunit mysteries, presented as case files, with testimonies, letters, pieces of evidence such as hairs or pills The reader had to go through the evidence to solve the mystery before unsealing the last pages of the file, which gave the answer Four of these Crime Dossiers were published Murder Off Miami, Who Killed Robert Prentice, The Malinsay Massacre, and Herewith The Clues.In the 1960s his publishers were selling a million copies of his books per year A small number of his books were made into films by Hammer, of which the best known is The Devil Rides Out book 1934, film 1968 His writing is very descriptive and in many works he manages to introduce his characters into real events while meeting real people For example, in the Roger Brook series the main character involves himself with Napoleon, and Jos phine whilst being a spy for the Prime Minister William Pitt Similarly, in the Gregory Sallust series, Sallust shares an evening meal with Hermann G ring.He also wrote non fiction works, including accounts of the Russian Revolution and King Charles II, and his autobiography He was considered an authority on the supernatural, satanism, the practice of exorcism, and black magic, to all of which he was hostile During his study of the paranormal, though, he joined the Ghost Club.From 1974 through 1977 he edited a series of 45 paperback reprints for the British publisher Sphere under the heading The Dennis Wheatley Library of the Occult , selecting the titles and writing short introductions for each book This series included both occult themed novels by the likes of Bram Stoker and Aleister Crowley and non fiction works on magic, occultism, and divination by authors such as the Theosophist H P Blavatsky, the historian Maurice Magre, the magician Isaac Bonewits, and the palm reader Cheiro.Two weeks before his death in November 1977, Wheatley received conditional absolution from his old friend Cyril Bobby Eastaugh, the Bishop of Peterborough.His estate library was sold in a catalogue sale by Basil Blackwell s in the 1970s, indicating a thoroughly well read individual with wide ranging interests particularly in historical fiction and Europe His influence has declined, partly due to difficulties in reprinting his works owing to copyright problems.Fifty two of Wheatley s novels were published posthumously in a set by Heron Books UK More recently, in April 2008 Dennis Wheatley s literary estate was acquired by media company Chorion.He invented a number of board games including Invasion.

    2. Although this is part of a series, it works well as a standalone novel. Fairly typical spy novel with some unusual supernatural themes thrown in. I can see why people say the main character influenced Fleming's Bond. Loses stars because of the annoying parts of the book that read like a history lesson.

    3. This is the first book I've read from Dennis Wheatley. I came across him while looking for great occult authors and he so happened to be one of the famous ones out there. Besides that he's also has written a lot of espionage books as well as a handful of science fiction. But of course his writing of black magic is what he's most popular for. This book is more of an espionage novel and is under the tales of Gregory Sallust, the British spy. Just so happens Mr. Sallust finds himself dealing with t [...]

    4. Wheatley has a good reputation, especially for his horror fiction. Here he attempts to blend espionage and the occult, set against the backdrop of World War II. It is the first book of his I've read and will probably be the last. Malacou is supposed to be evil, yet is little more than a dirty old man who casts horoscopes. Sallust is a failure as an action hero. His main 'strength' is the pure dumb luck that always saves him from precarious situations of his own doing) after another. Wheatley als [...]

    5. Probably not a lot of point writing a lengthy review for this one as it is out of print and I doubt very many people would read the review. Dennis Wheatley's black magic novels are fun but this one is a hybrid between WWII spy adventure and a tale of the occult. The supernatural part is fun but it is crowded out by rather pedestrian James Bondery. The audiobook reading is fun though, especially the Hitler dialog.

    6. Decided to give up on this. I loved the Devil rides out so much and was hoping for another interesting occult story but this was just too much of a war hero/James Bond type story. I probably would have tried to read it for longer but I just have too many good books on my shelf waiting to be read at the moment to have time for ones I'm not enjoying.

    7. Ultimately this novel suffers from being far too long. The final sections are almost a factual account of Hitler's last days in the bunker in Berlin. and while this is of interest historically, it tends to make the story drag.

    8. Another Wheatley masterpiece, this time with Gregory Sallust as the hero. A potent mixture of wartime Nazis, black magic, and Wheatley's notorious attention to detail make this another must read for fans of the genre.

    9. Engaging quite a bit and some key insights into Nazism - of that period The author's self-reference was marvellous

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