Now You See Her

Now You See Her GracefulPoeticOtto s voice is sympathetic and direct her imagination equally practical and romantic The Philadelphia Inquirer ENCHANTINGASTONISHING AND LOVELY Entertainment WeeklyKiki Shaw a game sh

  • Title: Now You See Her
  • Author: Whitney Otto
  • ISBN: 9780345378262
  • Page: 216
  • Format: Paperback
  • GracefulPoeticOtto s voice is sympathetic and direct, her imagination equally practical and romantic The Philadelphia Inquirer ENCHANTINGASTONISHING AND LOVELY Entertainment WeeklyKiki Shaw, a game show question writer, is about to turn forty She doesn t mind that, except that she s also disappearing Parts of her that were always there are vanishing, and GracefulPoeticOtto s voice is sympathetic and direct, her imagination equally practical and romantic The Philadelphia Inquirer ENCHANTINGASTONISHING AND LOVELY Entertainment WeeklyKiki Shaw, a game show question writer, is about to turn forty She doesn t mind that, except that she s also disappearing Parts of her that were always there are vanishing, and no one seems to notice As she contemplates this experience, Kiki makes certain discoveries about her life and those of the women closest to her Perhaps they will all evanesce bit by bit, until they detect where they misplaced themselves and their once promising lives.As she did in her New York Times bestseller, How to Make an American Quilt, Whitney Otto has created a rich gallery of voices and lives that draws us in and pierces our perceptions of who we are or should be The sight of a work and talent in progress is welcome in the House of Fiction The New York Times You are in the hands of a master Now sit back and enjoy it The Hartford Courant This gradually, even magically, unfolds to yield another of Otto s intricate, intimate tapestries Publishers Weekly

    • æ Now You See Her || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Whitney Otto
      216 Whitney Otto
    • thumbnail Title: æ Now You See Her || ✓ PDF Read by ✓ Whitney Otto
      Posted by:Whitney Otto
      Published :2020-01-20T04:31:12+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Now You See Her

    1. Whitney Otto is the bestselling author of How to Make an American Quilt which was made into a feature film , Now You See Her, and The Passion Dream Book A native of California, she lives with her husband and son in Portland, Oregon.

    2. I just wanted this book to be over with. The plot was not strong enough to hold my interest and it jumped all over the place too abstract- totally disappointing.

    3. I suffered through this one. It was tedious to say the least. A lot of back and forth with outer lying characters and not much with the main character until the end strange really.

    4. This book hurt my brain! Author Whitney Otto definitely expected me to step up my game and follow all the loose threads. Which I did but this novel took me almost two months to finish! It was beautifully written and unlike anything I've read before. But I will never read it again.And because of that, here are the passages I want to remember:Walt said: When my boy is gone people will drive by my house and will know that a tragedy has been visited upon it. They will be sympathetic and well meaning [...]

    5. This book had insight into women's lives and an interesting approach--it had trivia and love affairs and family history and travel, physical disappearances and even ghosts! But it was also distant and somewhat "flat" like the fizz gone out of a soft drink. I understand and I connect, but I don't care enough, and yet I think I will remember this book and not just as another book by an author I enjoyed before How to Make an American Quilt was wonderful) but because she shared the truth about women [...]

    6. This book was fantastically horrible. I think perhaps the author is not quite as deep as she thinks she is. There was all of this bizarre talk of "disappearing". One would assume that she meant metaphorically so, but noe kept insisting that the character was physically disappearing. Lots of details about each and every character's lives and thoughts but nothing nothing nothing ever happened. Oh, you thought for SURE things were GOING to happen. No. Nothing happened. I would recommend this book t [...]

    7. I read this directly after readingHow to Make an American Quilt. I really really didn't like it and thought it was stupid. I still remember some line in the book, about how two ex-lovers were lying if they were still friends, or if that was true, they'd never really loved each other. I remember my bullshit detector going off about that line while I was reading it at age 15, and I still think about how it's wrong over a decade later.

    8. What? I must be getting old. How else can I explain that I had so much trouble reading this book and making any sense out of it. It was just so preposterous and all the characters were such silly twits. What was it about really and should I have cared?

    9. There was something about this book that didn't seem grounded--the plot felt beneath a layer of fog, the characters not terribly compelling. Only when Kiki de Montparnasse entered the narrative did I begin to become curious, and unfortunately, that ended as soon as it began.

    10. A sorry choice for me. Found nothing interesting or appealing about any of the characters & had to force myself to finish.hoping things might improve. Sad to say, they did not.

    11. this book was a let down it started out with a really good premise but it started to drag and by the end it was already dead to me.

    12. As so many reviewers have said, this is NOT my cup of tea. I literally forced myself to finish. How could this book and How to Make an American Quilt be written by the same person?

    13. Admittedly _Now You See Her_ isn't my kind of book, in fact I never would have picked it up if better audiobook options had been available at the time. Maybe one has to be in the middle of a midlife crisis in order to appreciate this book, but I'm not even sure that would help. Otto begins with an interesting premise - a woman approaching her 40th birthday begins literally to disappear - and accompanies it with acute observations about how women of a certain age vanish from the American public e [...]

    14. This is a fantastic book in both senses of the word. Now You See Her is a fantastically written, beautiful, funny, feminist, and philosophical novel. It is also based on the fantastic premise that a 40 year old woman, Kiki Shaw, finds herself disappearing, and Whitney Otto, in her inimitable way manages to create the pleasure of a page-turning novel at the same time that she plays out the metaphor of the disappearing woman and weaves in historical research, visual art, literary figures, and psyc [...]

    15. NOW YOU SEE HER - OkayOtto, Whitney - NovelKiki Shaw, approaching age 40, finds that she is becoming invisible. This process is the result of the American male's attitude toward single, aging women. Kiki's women friends are also being rendered invisible and weightless, both physically and psychologically. Each has her own way of coping. Kiki finds the process unnerving but is helpless to stop it. When she disappears completely, she goes to Paris, where she meets the ghost of her namesake, Kiki d [...]

    16. This is a feminist version of Kafka's Metamorphosis. Instead of waking one morning to complete self-transformation into a large insect, this protagonist finds herself gradually disappearing as she nears forty. Many passages are profound and thought-provoking as the novel grapples with issues facing modern women today as they search for meaning, passion, and purpose. However, some tangents are a bit trited the novel ends on a decidedly corny note.

    17. I really started getting into this book when I identified "disappearing" literally as symbolic of how women become marginal and taken for granted. But then it got weird with ghosts traipsing through Paris, and didn't resolve the loose ends of all the characters that I found more interesting than the protagonist.

    18. Very interesting, smart book. She plays with the idea of women's visibility/invisibility in the world. She does this by looking through the eyes of different types of women who are interrelated. It is a book that deserves thorough analysis.

    19. A woman's mid life crisis expressed though her becoming invisible, taking stock and finally finding out what she wants from life. Kind of more in the vein of the author's other books about people who did not grow up.

    20. Couldn't bring myself to read this one for the longest time but once I did, I loved it. There is so much here about the importance of knowing yourself and finding yourself when you didn't even realize you were lost.

    21. I really enjoyed this book. The story itself is a little odd but it is a really fascinating read. I felt like I found a lot of little gems in this book. Of course, Whitney Otto is one of my favorite authors.

    22. I think this was the first Whitney Otto book I ever read. I loved it. It also made me decide that having a career writing the answers for Jeopardy would be amazing

    23. Reread this for the first time in over ten years, and really find it insightful for women "of a certain age". Too bad this wasn't a better seller. Back in mid-2006, I had to buy my copy used.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *